Evolving notes, images and sounds by Luis Apiolaza

Category: teaching (Page 8 of 14)

Back of the envelope look at school decile changes

Currently there is some discussion in New Zealand about the effect of the reclassification of schools in socioeconomic deciles. An interesting aspect of the funding system in New Zealand is that state and state-integrated schools with poorer families receive substantially more funding from the government than schools that receive students from richer families (see this page in the Ministry of Education’s website).
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Comment on Sustainability and innovation in staple crop production in the US Midwest

After writing a blog post about the paper “Sustainability and innovation in staple crop production in the US Midwest” I decided to submit a formal comment to the International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability in July 2013, which was published today. As far as I know, Heinemann et al. provided a rebuttal to my comments, which I have not seen but that should be published soon. This post is an example on how we can use open data (in this case from the USDA and FAO) and free software (R) to participate in scientific discussion (see supplementary material below).

The text below the *** represents my author’s version provided as part of my Green Access rights. The article published in the International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability [copyright Taylor & Francis]; is freely available online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14735903.2014.939842).
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Sometimes I feel (some) need for speed

I’m the first to acknowledge that most of my code could run faster. The truth of the matter is that, in essence, I write ‘quickies’: code that will run once or twice, so there is no incentive to spend days or hours in shaving seconds of a computation. Most analyses of research data fall in to this approach: read data-clean data-fit model-check model-be happy-write article-(perhaps) make data and code available-move on with life.

One of the reasons why my code doesn’t run faster or uses less memory is the trade-off between the cost of my time (very high) compared to the cost of more memory or faster processors (very cheap) and the gains of shaving a few seconds or minutes of computer time, which tend to be fairly little.
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R as a second language

Imagine that you are studying English as a second language; you learn the basic rules, some vocabulary and start writing sentences. After a little while, it is very likely that you’ll write grammatically correct sentences that no native speaker would use. You’d be following the formalisms but ignoring culture, idioms, slang and patterns of effective use.

R is a language and any newcomers, particularly if they already know another programming language, will struggle at the beginning to get what is beyond the formal grammar and vocabulary. I use R for inquisition: testing ideas, data exploration, visualization; under this setting, the easiest is to perform a task the more likely is one going to do it. It is possible to use several other languages for this but—and I think this is an important but—R’s brevity reduces the time between thinking and implementation, so we can move on and keep on trying new ideas.
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Teaching linear models

I teach several courses every year and the most difficult to pull off is FORE224/STAT202: regression modeling.

The academic promotion application form in my university includes a section on one’s ‘teaching philosophy’. I struggle with that part because I suspect I lack anything as grandiose as a philosophy when teaching: as most university lecturers I never studied teaching, although I try to do my best. If anything, I can say that I enjoy teaching and helping students to ‘get it’ and that I want to instill a sense of ‘statistics is fun’ in them. I spend quite a bit of time looking for memorable examples, linking to stats in the news (statschat and listening the news while walking my dog are very helpful here) and collecting data. But a philosophy? Don’t think so.

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